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sed -i -e 's/jool/Jool/g' -e 's/tayga/Tayga/g' *.tex

+ manual fixes on that one
master
Nico Schottelius 3 years ago
parent
commit
971c0e02c3
  1. 12
      doc/Design.tex
  2. 2
      doc/Introduction.tex
  3. 14
      doc/Results.tex
  4. 12
      doc/appendix.tex

12
doc/Design.tex

@ -270,7 +270,7 @@ to solve this problem:
and inserts the original packet afterwards back into the
switch. Figure \ref{fig:p4switchstateful} shows the flow of a packet
with stateful translation in detail.
\item With tayga we rely on the Linux kernel NAT44 capabilities
\item With Tayga we rely on the Linux kernel NAT44 capabilities
\item Jool implements its own stateful mechanism based on port
ranges
\end{itemize}
@ -296,7 +296,7 @@ commands allow interactive testing on TCP and UDP connections, while
the iperf commands fully utilise the available bandwidth with test
data.
The socat and iperf commands are used to verify all three NAT64
implementations (p4, tayga, jool).
implementations (p4, Tayga, Jool).
\begin{table}[htbp]
\begin{center}\begin{minipage}{\textwidth}
\begin{tabular}{| c | c | c |}
@ -377,9 +377,9 @@ networks and IPv6 addresses are used:
\hline
2001:db8:42::a00:2a & In-network IPv6 address mapped to 10.0.0.42 (p4)\\
\hline
2001:db8:23::a00:2a & IPv6 address mapped to 10.0.0.42 (tayga) \\
2001:db8:23::a00:2a & IPv6 address mapped to 10.0.0.42 (Tayga) \\
\hline
2001:db8:23::2a & IPv6 address mapped to 10.0.0.42 (jool)\\
2001:db8:23::2a & IPv6 address mapped to 10.0.0.42 (Jool)\\
\hline
\end{tabular}
\end{minipage}
@ -405,9 +405,9 @@ from the 10.0.0.0/8 range as follows:
\hline
10.0.0.66 & In-network IPv4 address mapped to 2001:db8:42::42 (p4)\\
\hline
10.0.1.42 & IPv4 address mapped to 2001:db8:42::42 (tayga)\\
10.0.1.42 & IPv4 address mapped to 2001:db8:42::42 (Tayga)\\
\hline
10.0.1.66 & IPv4 address mapped to 2001:db8:42::42 (jool)\\
10.0.1.66 & IPv4 address mapped to 2001:db8:42::42 (Jool)\\
\hline
\end{tabular}
\end{minipage}

2
doc/Introduction.tex

@ -102,6 +102,6 @@ software~\cite{_implem_your_switc_target_with_bmv2}. Figure
\ref{fig:v6v4mixed} shows how the design differs for an in-network
solution.
Even on fast CPUs, software solutions like
tayga~\cite{lutchansky:_tayga_simpl_nat64_linux}
Tayga~\cite{lutchansky:_Tayga_simpl_nat64_linux}
can be CPU bound (see section \ref{results:softwarenat64}) and are
incapable of translating protocols at line speed.

14
doc/Results.tex

@ -19,8 +19,8 @@ NAT64~\cite{schottelius:thesisrepo}. It contains parsers
for all related protocols (IPv6, IPv4, UDP, TCP, ICMP, ICMP6, NDP,
ARP), supports EAMT as defined by RFC7757 ~\cite{rfc7757}, and is
feature equivalent to the two compared software solutions
tayga~\cite{lutchansky:_tayga_simpl_nat64_linux} and
jool~\cite{mexico:_jool_open_sourc_siit_nat64_linux}.
Tayga~\cite{lutchansky:_Tayga_simpl_nat64_linux} and
Jool~\cite{mexico:_Jool_open_sourc_siit_nat64_linux}.
Due to limitations in the P4 environment of the
NetFPGA environment, the BMV2 implementation
is more feature rich.
@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ warm up phase.\footnote{iperf -O 10 parameter, see section \ref{design:tests}.}
% ok
% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
\subsection{\label{results:benchmark:summary}Benchmark Summary}
Overall \textbf{tayga} has shown to be the slowest translator with an achieved
Overall \textbf{Tayga} has shown to be the slowest translator with an achieved
bandwidth of \textbf{about 3 Gbit/s}, followed by \textbf{Jool} that translates at
about \textbf{8 Gbit/s}. \textbf{Our solution} is the fastest with an almost line rate
translation speed of about \textbf{9 Gbit/s}.
@ -443,7 +443,7 @@ in the UDP benchmarks incorporates the packets loss (compare tables
\ref{tab:benchmarkv6v4udp} and \ref{tab:benchmarkv6v4udp}).
Both software solutions showed significant loss of packets in the UDP
based benchmarks (tayga: up to 91\%, jool up to 71\%), while the
based benchmarks (Tayga: up to 91\%, Jool up to 71\%), while the
P4/NetFPGA showed a maximum of 0.01\% packet loss. Packet loss is only
recorded by iperf for UDP based benchmarks, as TCP packets are confirmed and
resent if necessary.
@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ identical in different benchmark runs.
The CPU load for TCP based benchmarks with Jool was almost negligible,
however for UDP based benchmarks one core was almost 100\%
utilised. In all benchmarks with tayga, one CPU was fully
utilised. In all benchmarks with Tayga, one CPU was fully
utilised. When the translation for P4/NetFPGA happens within the
NetFPGA card, there was no CPU utilisation visible on the NAT64 host.
@ -476,11 +476,11 @@ connections might be affected by the load generator limits. While
there is no visible evidence in our results, this problem might become
more significant with higher speed links.
While tayga's performance is reduced with the growing number of
While Tayga's performance is reduced with the growing number of
parallel connections, both Jool and our P4/NetFPGA implementations
vary only slighty.
Overall the performance of tayga, a Linux user space program, is as
Overall the performance of Tayga, a Linux user space program, is as
expected. We were surprised about the good performance of Jool, which,
while slower than the P4/NetFPGA solution, is almost on par with our solution.
% ----------------------------------------------------------------------

12
doc/appendix.tex

@ -1300,7 +1300,7 @@ root@ESPRIMO-P956:~#
\end{verbatim}
%---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\section{\label{benchmark:tayga}Tayga}
\section{\label{benchmark:Tayga}Tayga}
Tayga is installed from the regular package database:
\begin{verbatim}
ii tayga 0.9.2-6 amd64 userspace stateless NAT64
@ -1366,7 +1366,7 @@ net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding = 1
[15:20] nsg-System:~# sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1
\end{verbatim}
And we test NAT64 with tayga:
And we test NAT64 with Tayga:
\begin{tiny}
\begin{verbatim}
nico@ESPRIMO-P956:~$ ping -c2 10.0.1.42
@ -1407,9 +1407,9 @@ rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.240/0.320/0.400/0.080 ms
nico@ESPRIMO-P956:~$
\end{verbatim}
%---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\section{\label{benchmark:jool}Jool}
\section{\label{benchmark:Jool}Jool}
We install Jool 4.0.1 from source from
\url{https://www.jool.mx/en/download.html} as follows:
\url{https://www.Jool.mx/en/download.html} as follows:
\begin{tiny}
\begin{verbatim}
nico@nsg-System:~$ wget https://github.com/NICMx/Jool/releases/download/v4.0.1/jool_4.0.1.tar.gz
@ -1426,8 +1426,8 @@ We enable forwarding:
sysctl -w net.ipv4.conf.all.forwarding=1
sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1
\end{verbatim}
We configure jool to map the network prefixes and setup iptables to
redirect the traffic into the jool instance:
We configure Jool to map the network prefixes and setup iptables to
redirect the traffic into the Jool instance:
\begin{tiny}
\begin{verbatim}
[16:53] nsg-System:~# modprobe jool_siit

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