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cleanup background #1

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Nico Schottelius 3 years ago
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d771c7de6b
  1. 18
      doc/Background.tex
  2. BIN
      doc/Thesis.pdf
  3. 2
      doc/refs/refs.bib

18
doc/Background.tex

@ -272,7 +272,7 @@ IPv6Address('64:ff9b::c000:200')
Network administrators can choose to use either the well known prefix
or to use a network block of their own to map the
Internet.\footnote{For instance
2a0a:e5c0:0:1::/96~\ref{ungleich:networkinfra}.}
2a0a:e5c0:0:1::/96~\cite{ungleich:networkinfrastructure}.}
While a /96 prefix seems a natural selection (it provides exactly 32 bit),
other prefix lengths are defined in RFC6052 (see figure
\ref{fig:prefixlen}) that allow flexible embedding of the IPv4 address.
@ -327,8 +327,11 @@ A record and gets an answer that the name
\textit{ipv4onlyhost.example.com} resolves to the IPv4 address
\textit{192.0.2.0}. The DNS64 server then embeds the IPv4 address in
the configured IPv6 prefix (\textit{64:ff9b::/96} in this case) and
returns a fake AAAA record to the IPv6 only host.
returns a fake AAAA record to the IPv6 only host. The IPv6 only host
then will use address to connect to. The NAT64 translator recognises
either that the address is part of a configured prefix or that it has
a dedicated table entry for mapping this IPv6 address to an IPv4
address and translates it accordingly.
% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
\section{\label{background:checksums}Protocol Checksums}
One challenge for translating IPv6-IPv4 are checksums of higher level
@ -397,7 +400,7 @@ access the payload.
In relation to IPv6 and IPv4, there are in general three different
network designs possible:
The oldest form are IPv4 only networks (see figure
\ref{fig:v4onlynet}.
\ref{fig:v4onlynet}).
These networks consist of
hosts that are either not configured for IPv6 or are even technically
incapable of enabling the IPv6 protocol. These nodes are connected to
@ -436,12 +439,13 @@ As shown in figures \ref{fig:ipv4header} and \ref{fig:ipv6header}
the IPv4 address size is 32 bit, while the IPv6 address size is 128
bit.
Without an extension to the address space, there is no protocol independent
mapping of IPv4 address to IPv6 (see section
\ref{background:transition:nat64})
that can cover the whole IPv6 address space. Thus IPv4 only hosts can
mapping of IPv4 address to IPv6\footnote{See section
\ref{background:ip}.} that can cover the whole IPv6 address space.
Thus IPv4 only hosts can
never address every host in the IPv6 Internet. While protocol
dependent translations can try to minimise the impact, accessing all
IPv6 addresses independent of the protcol is not possible.
% ok
% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
\subsection{\label{background:networkdesign:dualstack}Dualstack network
maintenance}

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doc/Thesis.pdf

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2
doc/refs/refs.bib

@ -85,7 +85,7 @@
howpublished = {\url{https://ungleich.ch/en-us/cms/blog/2019/01/09/die-ipv4-die/}}}
@Misc{ungleich:networkinfra,
@Misc{ungleich:networkinfrastructure,
author = {ungleich},
title = {The ungleich network infrastructure},
howpublished = {\url{https://redmine.ungleich.ch/projects/open-infrastructure/wiki/The_ungleich_network_infrastructure}},

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